In Buddhism, where enlightenment is a primary goal, it is featured in pictures of the Medication Buddha. He is holding Haritaki in both palms. In one palm Haritaki is a component which gives eternal life, an incredible benefit. In Tibetan Buddhism Haritaki is part of nearly every medication. It is likewise acknowledged for its metaphysical powers, being referred to as “Supreme Nectar that Lights up the Mind”.

A systematic review from 2016 examined the preclinical and small human trials that have been conducted with certain commercially available strains of probiotic bacteria and found that among those tested, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillusgenera (B. longum, B. breve, B. infantis, L. helveticus, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, and L. casei), had the most potential to be useful for certain central nervous system disorders.[8]
“We have conducted a registry study of almost 15,000 patients who have had the vagus nerve in their stomach severed. Between approximately 1970-1995 this procedure was a very common method of ulcer treatment. If it really is correct that Parkinson’s starts in the gut and spreads through the vagus nerve, then these vagotomy patients should naturally be protected against developing Parkinson’s disease,” explains postdoc at Aarhus University Elisabeth Svensson on the hypothesis behind the study.
A number of the physical benefits come from the impacts that Haritaki has on the gastro-intestinal system. As science is showing, a lively healthy stomach and intestinal tract means that all the organs such as the liver and kidneys are receiving contaminant complimentary material for them to deal with. This in turn means that the remainder of the body receives blood that has dietary value, and therefore boosts optimum efficiency.

Haritaki (Terminalia chebula Retz., Family: Combretaceae) possesses a great therapeutic value and is widely distributed in India, up to an altitude of 1500 m. Though Terminalia chebula Retz is the only botanical source of Haritaki, the uses of its varieties along with their sources, identifying features and therapeutic uses are described in Ayurvedic classics and other medical literature. In the present study, a detailed review has been carried out on different varieties of Haritaki.

Literally meaning “three fruits,” triphala is a traditional Ayurvedic herbal formulation consisting of three fruits native to the Indian subcontinent: Amalaki (Emblica officinalis), Bibhitaki, (Terminalia belerica) and Haritaki (Terminalia chebula). Also known as “triphala churna,” it is one of the most popular formulas in Ayurveda and has many health benefits for all three of Ayurveda's dosha constitutions. Take the free Ayurvedic Profile™ quiz to learn your constitution and state of imbalance.
5] Instead of Tea or Coffee prepare a decoction from the equal parts of stem of Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia), fruit of Neem, leaf of snakeguard, and Triphala. A dose of 14 to 28 ml should be taken twice/day. Take it only after cooling down to the room temperature. If you dont find the taste of above one, try this second option - prepare a decoction of equal parts of dried ginger, fruit of coriander, and leaf of snakeguard. A dose of 14 to 28 ml should be taken twice/day, keep in mind if you are mixing sugar- dont boil the sugar.
As one of the three ingredients in the Ayurvedic super formula Triphala, Haritaki is considered to be one of the best herbs for balancing vata dosha. Supporting the body's natural cleansing process, it gently removes accumulated natural toxins in the gastrointestinal tract. As a rejuvenative, it strengthens and nourishes the tissues and supports the proper function of the colon, lungs, liver, and spleen. Haritaki is traditionally used to address all vata-related imbalances. It maintains regular elimination, helps promote healthy body mass, and supports comfortable and complete digestion. Haritaki is highly revered in India, as it is believed to increase energy, intelligence, and awareness.*
While haritaki is so well known for its affinity for vata, haritaki is acutally tridoshic, meaning that it can help bring balance to all three doshas. We can partly make sense of this by looking at its rasa (taste). Haritaki contains five of the six tastes, all but salty. Thanks to the sweet, bitter, and astringent tastes, haritaki can help pacify excess pitta; with the presence of the astringent, bitter, and pungent tastes, it helps remove excess kapha; and with the sweet and sour tastes, it helps with excess vata.12 Beyond this, we don’t really know what makes haritaki tridoshic with such a knack for removing any excess dosha. This is one of haritaki’s prabhavas, or unique, inexplicable actions (and yes, haritaki has more than one prabhava!). And yet, somehow haritaki gracefully pulls it off.
“As a tonic for promoting and preventing the effects of age, chebulic myrobalan [haritaki] should be taken every morning with salt during the rainy season, with sugar in the autumn, with ginger in the first half of winter, with long pepper in the second half of winter, with honey in the spring, and with treacle in the hot months.”— Traditional Ayurvedic instruction21
There are many paths to enlightenment. I recommend meditation and following the teachings of an enlightened master. Why try something on your own that others have mastered and are able to guide you through? If I use the analogy of wanting to become a brain surgeon, why would you consider experimenting on your own, or why bother spending time studying with a book only? Another option is to train with a regular General practitioner. That is not going to get you very far either. Even studying with a heart surgeon is unsafe. Go for the best training that is proven and available. Anything else is illogical.
It is known that  there is a direct link between the the health of our gastro-intestinal tract and our brain health. Research has shown that diseases such as dementia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s can be identified as beginning in the digestive tract and then spreading to the brain over a period of up to 10 years. The research on this is added at the end of this article
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